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Home > Cultural Art > Asian Art > Asian Food Art > Asian Tea Art

Asian Tea Art

Asian tea art is considered a part of contemporary cuisine art because of its iconic association with Asian cuisine. However, tea art in Oriental cultures is a far more important icon than just being a beverage of choice. This type of art is considered a culture in and of itself among Asian populations and is treated differently and yet with equal reverence, in each individual culture. Asian tea art among the Chinese is a longstanding tradition and has several subtle connotations including a show of respect, thanks, and to unite families together. Additionally, folding the napkin used during these ceremonies is supposed to drive away bad Qi, or life energy, although this element is rarely depicted in this form of art.

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Asian Tea Prints

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Bamboo Tea Room II
by Krista Sewell
16" x 12"
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Bamboo Tea Room I
by Krista Sewell
16" x 12"
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Takara Tea Room
by Krista Sewell
10" x 12"
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Sakura Tea I
by Krista Sewell
10" x 12"
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Bento Box Sushi II
by Connie Tunick
13" x 14"
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A Pot of Tea and Keys, 1822
by Katsushika Hokusai
18" x 24"
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Exotic Tea (D) II
by Unknown
9" x 12"
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Willow Tea Pot
by Chariklia Zarris
10" x 10"
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Exotic Tea (D) I
by Unknown
10" x 13"
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Green Tea I
by Silvia Vassileva
8" x 20"
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Green Tea II
by Silvia Vassileva
8" x 20"
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Darjeeling Tea
by Charlene Audrey
8" x 10"
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Sakura Tea II
by Krista Sewell
10" x 12"
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Lucky Bamboo I
by Emmanuel Cometa
10" x 12"
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Ginkgo Tea Pot
by Chariklia Zarris
10" x 10"
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Tea
by Angela Ferrante
6" x 6"
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Virtues of Knowledge
by Sherry Chen
16" x 20"
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Bento Box Sushi I
by Connie Tunick
13" x 14"
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Asian Tea Set II
by Jennifer Sosik
8" x 8"
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Asian Tea Set I
by Jennifer Sosik
8" x 8"
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Geisha, Tokyo, Honshu, Japan
by Unknown
18" x 24"
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Tea harvesting, Assam, India
by Panoramic Images
36" x 12"
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Tea harvesting, Assam, India
by Panoramic Images
27" x 9"
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Green Tea
by Gregory Gorham
8" x 20"
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Green Tea - petite
by Gregory Gorham
4" x 10"
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Relaxation I
by Patricia Pinto
14" x 11"
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Relaxation II
by Patricia Pinto
14" x 11"
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The Waterlily Pond with the Japanese Bridge, 1899
by Claude Monet
24" x 18"
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Asian Food Art (41 items) | View All
Sushi Serving
by Krista Sewell
10" x 12"
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Sushi I
by Grace Popp
12" x 12"
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Sushi II
by Grace Popp
12" x 12"
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The reason why this element is frequently lacking in artwork depicting Asian tea art is because Chinese artists believe that drawing the napkin would cause bad energy to be trapped within the folds of the painted napkin rather than allowing it to be released into the universe.

Japanese tea art, as depicted by famous artist Katsushika Hokusai in his work 'A Pot of Tea and Keys', is also considered an art in Japanese culture and has strong Zen Buddhist connotations. Out of respect for this practice, Asian tea artists typically depict their tea art in a contemplative and peaceful method, such as in the series 'Sakura Tea' by Krista Sewell.

The important difference between Asian tea art and its Western counterparts is the purpose behind making the artwork. Western artists would create art for aesthetic reasons, but Eastern artists had a different agenda. For them, paintings were traditionally used as tools for enriching the spirit and mind of those who saw it. Because Asian cultures traditionally used tea as a medicine for curing common ills in ancient times, it had the same effect when placed on canvas. In the same way that drinking tea would cure earthly, Asian tea art is meant to help cure the illnesses of the spirit and promote balance and well-being within the viewer.
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